Where to place a piano in your home

Posted by Sarah Czarnecki on

Choosing where to put your piano is more than a design choice – it can affect your instrument's sound and even its longevity. Think of it this way: if you wouldn’t be comfortable sitting in that place day in and day out, neither would your piano. 

To get the most out of your piano, choosing the right space is key.

First, understand where NOT to place your piano:

  • Below windows
  • Next to exterior doors
  • Against non-insulated exterior walls
  • Next to heating ducts, air conditioners, or radiators
  • Near fireplaces or wood-burning stoves
  • On concrete floors
  • On in-floor radiant heating units
  • In attics or basements, or garages
  • In damp or humid spaces
  • Outside

This list is far from exhaustive, but you may have noticed a pattern: Environment is everything.

Any room or space that goes through a lot of environmental changes is going to be hard on your instrument because pianos are mostly made of wood. Wood, especially the fragile and carefully calibrated kind that make up a piano, is very sensitive to:

  • Temperature swings
  • Humidity fluctuations
  • Drafts
  • Direct sunlight
  • Fire and smoke

Most of the time, pianos stay in one spot for years or even decades. Putting your piano in a less-than-ideal location can shorten its lifespan and rack up maintenance bills. Think rot, mold, warped wood, broken parts, damaged finish, and poor sound. 

Here’s where you should place your piano:

  • In the center of a climate-controlled room
  • Against interior walls
  • Against well-insulated exterior walls away from windows
  • Away from heavy foot traffic

In a perfect world, your piano should also be kept at a steady 70°F and 45% humidity.

But realistically, most of us aren’t able to abide by all the piano placement rules. We certainly aren’t. Instead, just do your best to find an appropriately piano-friendly location and take steps to protect your piano:

 

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